ThAi LiFe

 

Avocado With Ice Cream, The Thai Way

Avocado would surely not rate as one of the 'popular' Thai fruits but, the few Thais who eat this fruit have found a way of eating it their way - The Thai Way. Avocado salad and more often gluacamole is the most popular way in which the world eats avocados. This fruit that is credited with being a source of 'good cholesterol is rarely eaten in cooked form - it is best enjoyed uncooked but in a ripe condition. Imported avocados are available in Thailand but, the price is a deterrent for most Thais. An innovative project sponsored by the Thai Royal family has now brought avocados within the reach of many more Thais. This delicious fruit is now grown in Thailand although, in limited quantities. Many Thais who are accustomed to eating avocados prefer to make the delicious avocado salad - generally in non-vegetarian style. At a recent fair organized in one of the upscale shopping centers in downtown Bangkok, introduced many Thais to what is likely to be one of the best Thai ways to eat the fruit. Ice with avocado is not a story any more as many people relish the fruit along with ice cream but, here is something quite interesting, delicious and probably new to many of you. 

At the fair was a stall that for a very modest price, served ripe avocado pieces topped with coconut ice cream. And the quantity of this serving was large enough to qualify as a decent sized dessert. Cutting an avocado might not sound like a complicated task but, the challenge begins a little before you start cutting the fruit. You would need to first, determine whether the avocado is ripe enough to be really enjoyed - you do not want it to be tough and raw nor, over ripe and soggy. Here is how avocados are tested for ripeness by professional chefs across the globe. Hold the avocado in your hand and turn it around till one side (not the top) faces you. Gently push your thumb into the fruit, a ripe avocado will give a slight dip inwards. Don't press too hard and do not stick your fingernail into the fruit. If the avocado does not yield and feels stiff, it means that it still needs time to ripen. On the other hand if your avocado almost feels like it is going to get pierced with your moderate thumb pressure - it is over ripe and should not be consumed. 

If you take a look at the image of the avocado coconut ice cream shown above, you will notice that the avocado pieces are quite greenish in color. This is the color of a ripe avocado on the portion that is just under the skin - the inner portion would be basically yellow probably with a very faint green tint. Skinning a ripe avocado is not a complicated if you know the right way to do it - you cannot use a knife and strip off the outer skin so do not try that. Here is the right way to cut and strip the avocado of it's skin. You cut the fruit with a sharp knife (mind your hand), by running a cut across it vertically. Do not try to make two pieces of the entire fruit, the idea is to just graze the seed of the fruit - the seed should not be cut along with the fruit. Once you have made the cut all around the fruit right up to (but not including) the seed, keep the knife aside, use both your hands and separate the fruit into two pieces. The seed would remain whole and stuck to one of the two avocado pieces - it should be easy to 'pluck' the seed out from a ripe avocado - use your fingers to do that. 

You now have the two avocado halves without the seed, experts often use a knife to scoop the avocado out of the skin but that could be dangerous. What you can safely do is to take a fairly wide spoon and scoop the avocado off the skin, get as near to the skin as possible. You might have to so this a couple of times until you remove all the fruit from the skin but, practice will make it easier. Health experts often recommend that fruits and vegetables be eaten along with the skin where possible, unfortunately you cannot eat an avocado along with it's skin. The secret is that most of the nutrients in the fruit lie just below the skin, they are quite concentrated in that portion. So when you do the scoop inside the avocado piece, get as near to the skin as possible. Now take another look at the avocado pieces in the cup of avocado coconut ice cream shown above, the fruits have been perfectly cut  - no skin but that layer just below the skin is almost completely retained in the pieces. 

Now back to the avocado coconut ice cream experience. All you had to do was to use the spoon and run it through the coconut ice cream and the avocado pieces, the combination was absolutely mouth watering. And as you casually walked around eating the coconut ice cream and avocado, the ice cream started to melt and spread over and between the avocado pieces - this fluid flow actually added an interesting texture to the flavor, so you enjoyed the avocado ice cream treat right up to the very last spoon. 

Talking about the melted coconut ice cream dripping into the avocado pieces below brings another interesting variation to mind. The same vending stall was offering the option to pour sweetened coconut milk, quite thick so it would better be referred to as coconut cream - over the avocado pieces. Something worth trying another day, the substantial quantity of the avocados and coconut ice cream in the cup did not leave much room in the palate for the coconut milk option. 


Adapted From: Avocado With Ice Cream Report.